Monday, July 15, 2013

Zimmerman Found Not-Guilty/The Church Found GUILTY

Many writers write every single day. Some write three or four or five days a week according to schedule.

I write when I have to write.

Today I find myself in that particular mode. I am writing because I must.



After Saturday's verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial, a verdict of not-guilty, I remained quiet and reflective.

My emotions: sadness, disappointment, confusion.

And yet, my words were few, except for re-posting an old blog post about the case.

But that wasn't the case in the social media world around me. On Twitter and Facebook, I read comment after comment from my friends, family members and acquaintances concerning the trial.

Some expressed fear for their own sons. Some shared their disillusionment over the US legal system. Many expressed their infuriation.

And yet a noticed a strange paradox.

For the most part, my friends that expressed their emotions, encouraged prayer for the Martin family and/or reminded others to trust in God -- the Ultimate Judge in any trial -- happened to be African American.

On the other hand, the majority of my non-African American friends were eerily silent. 

I could almost hear crickets chirping out there in cyberspace.

Today, my feelings have grown beyond this particular case to include my disappointment over the stark polarization of our country.

Yes folks, we still live in a black-and-white country. Even in the Body of Christ.

In the Church, we fail to rejoice when our brothers and sisters of different races rejoice.

We fail to mourn when they mourn.

We fail to even give a darn.

And yet, we say we have the same Father.

We say we belong to the same family of God.

We say there's no difference between us, deep down on the inside of us, way below our skin.

I say, can be begin to live this way?

Can we put aside our political affiliations, our educational backgrounds, our personal preferences (e.g. our favorite worship music) and even our races, to see life through lenses different than our own?

I say, if we truly have the very Spirit of the Living God inside us -- sure we can!

Brothers and Sisters of every hue, race and culture -- let's start today.

Love,

Carla